Please note, BioLabTests are UNABLE TO TEST ANY VIRUSES including SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)
Please note, BioLabTests are UNABLE TO TEST ANY VIRUSES including SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)
Blog – Microbiology Testing lab2023-04-19T09:58:20+01:00

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Celebrating International Microorganism Day

September 18th, 2023|Categories: Awareness Day, Microbiology|

Until recently, genetics has been like a read only document. We could see and map DNA, but we couldn’t change it in any significant way. That was, until CRISPR but where did it start? Today we’ll be talking about some very basic genetics and how bacteria have led to a massive change in how we interact with it.

CRISPR’s Revolutionary Role in Genomic Editing

August 17th, 2023|Categories: Microbiology|

Until recently, genetics has been like a read only document. We could see and map DNA, but we couldn’t change it in any significant way. That was, until CRISPR but where did it start? Today we’ll be talking about some very basic genetics and how bacteria have led to a massive change in how we interact with it.

Exploring Cordyceps: The Fungal Apocalypse of The Last of Us

April 19th, 2023|Categories: Awareness Day|Tags: , |

Cordyceps have recently gained a lot of attention due to their appearance in the hit video game and TV series, The Last of Us. In the show, the Cordyceps fungus mutates and becomes parasitic to humans. While this is purely fictional, it highlights the fascinating and potentially dangerous properties of this type of fungus.

Radiation-Eating Bacteria: Deinococcus Radiodurans.

October 18th, 2022|Categories: Microbiology|

The world’s toughest bacterium, Deinococcus Radiodurans can survive extreme radiation, and has been found thriving in many places - including the inside of nuclear reactor walls. This unique microbe is a type of ancient bacteria, surviving with no clear genetic affinity with any other bacterial lineage.

Metal-eating bacteria: Aboard the Titanic

August 31st, 2022|Categories: Microbiology|Tags: , , , |

The RMS Ttitanic was the largest liners ever built between 1911 and 1912; she was 269 meters long and 28 meters wide made of 1-inch-thick steel and iron. When the wreck was later discovered in 1985 on the ocean floor, it was able to shed light on the details of the sunken ship.

Celebrating International Microorganism Day

September 18th, 2023|Categories: Awareness Day, Microbiology|

Until recently, genetics has been like a read only document. We could see and map DNA, but we couldn’t change it in any significant way. That was, until CRISPR but where did it start? Today we’ll be talking about some very basic genetics and how bacteria have led to a massive change in how we interact with it.

CRISPR’s Revolutionary Role in Genomic Editing

August 17th, 2023|Categories: Microbiology|

Until recently, genetics has been like a read only document. We could see and map DNA, but we couldn’t change it in any significant way. That was, until CRISPR but where did it start? Today we’ll be talking about some very basic genetics and how bacteria have led to a massive change in how we interact with it.

Exploring Cordyceps: The Fungal Apocalypse of The Last of Us

April 19th, 2023|Categories: Awareness Day|Tags: , |

Cordyceps have recently gained a lot of attention due to their appearance in the hit video game and TV series, The Last of Us. In the show, the Cordyceps fungus mutates and becomes parasitic to humans. While this is purely fictional, it highlights the fascinating and potentially dangerous properties of this type of fungus.

Radiation-Eating Bacteria: Deinococcus Radiodurans.

October 18th, 2022|Categories: Microbiology|

The world’s toughest bacterium, Deinococcus Radiodurans can survive extreme radiation, and has been found thriving in many places - including the inside of nuclear reactor walls. This unique microbe is a type of ancient bacteria, surviving with no clear genetic affinity with any other bacterial lineage.

Metal-eating bacteria: Aboard the Titanic

August 31st, 2022|Categories: Microbiology|Tags: , , , |

The RMS Ttitanic was the largest liners ever built between 1911 and 1912; she was 269 meters long and 28 meters wide made of 1-inch-thick steel and iron. When the wreck was later discovered in 1985 on the ocean floor, it was able to shed light on the details of the sunken ship.

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